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and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
in northwest. healthpeak to the world organization piece a director for the eastern mediterranean joining us now on the telephone from cairo. the deaths of nine health workers in 24 hours in pakistan is surely an alarming six ways and. >> very tragic. this is really a sad day for global health, but said they also for the children in pakistan. we joined the government of pakistan in condemning the killings that have been taking place over the last three days. >> while you are condemning the killings taking place in pakistan, why weren't these volunteers putting their lives at risk and in fact, polio workers have been threatened in the past, why weren't they given adequate protection? >> the government of pakistan is organizing these campaigns with support of the world health organization, unicef, international partners. we do our very best to protect all polio workers in pakistan. but you know, this is a huge country and the government of pakistan is of course organizing these campaigns. >> but this is a campaign backed by the united nations and the world health organization. why isn't the wo
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
you in, harris. thank you for joining us. "america live" starts right now. >> fox news extreme weather alert on the deadly storm that has caused major problems from texas to the northeast the storm is now blamed for a total of 15 deaths. whipping up tornados in the south, strong winds and rain along the atlantic coastline and dumping heavy snow from the plains to new england. the northeast getting hammered today. some areas are seeing more than a foot of snow while others deal with a heavy wind-swept rain leading to big airport delays in ohio, more than a thousand trucks are sent out, some getting heavy police escort as winds cause zero visibility. drivers say the situation is awful. >> i have seen 10 cars in an accident. i have saw a lexus fly into a ditch. i saw a semi-truck jackknife. all kinds of stuff. >> i have lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor-trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. so i think people are just not really driving slow enough for the conditions. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents thus far in
left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled. the news continues. we will see you back here on monday. >> greta: tonight is america getting weak? vice-president dick cheney slamming president obama's foreign policy. >> our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us, and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president makes bold statements and bold talk in the last couple of days about developments in syria, but i don't think they care. >> greta: you'll hear more from vice-president cheney in a few minutes, but first, the big threat here at home. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. >> tax cuts? not government spending, not irresponsible entitlements. that gets a pass. it will be tax cuts. obama's premise that this country'country'scountry's firse fraudulent and he's fixing it, and they'll be etched in stone. tax cuts. >> the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter. >> when it comes to fiscal cliff t
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
for his alleged role in the attack that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. molly is live in washington with the latest. hi, molly. >> hi, rick. he is a leader in the terror world. he is ambitious and very dangerous and now egyptian authorities aided by u.s. intelligence have him. officials have been tracking him for months according to the "wall street journal" and interest intensified after followers participated in the attack in benghazi, libya. he was captured in the past week or so, but we don't have details yet on how he was detained. u.s.ish ifs have not been able to interrogate him yet. here is what we know. ahmad is a former egyptian jihad member. he was released from a prison in march of 2011. he is the leader of the jamal network and has been setting up terror training camps in libya and egypt with some financial help from al-qaeda and yemen. and he was trying to set up al-qaeda in egypt. meanwhile secretary of state hillary clinton will be testifying on the benghazi uhing tay. a review board investigating the attack should be completed soon and s
, it is not good enough to be for him to say liks behind us. this will do the opposite. martha: there is the scene there. that is a live shot this morning. we were told there would be perhaps thousands of people gathering on the scene. certainly seems to becoming out to be that kind of a turnout. take a look at that this morning, 9:01 eastern time in lansing, michigan. the governor is set to sign this into law later today. it will become the 24th right to work state in the nation. this is growing trend across the united states. you look at states like michigan and wisconsin, both very big union states where this is a real, perhaps, turning point in this fight. mike tobin on the ground live at the capital in lansing. what is happening now, mike? >> reporter: well, it is interesting, martha, top democrats in michigan say despite everything you see, despite the show of force on the lawn at the capitol this state fight is really over. two senate bills are expected to go to the house for a vote of concurrence and they are expected to last. as you look around at live pictures. you look at video we have
.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar ste
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
to us there wasn't anything we couldn't do. there is no limits as to how far we can go. we have limits because we got here late, the language, the skills, but you can be anything you want. and i can't tell you how important that is for a young person to not only have dreams and believe those dreams are possible. if i worry about anything, i spoke about this last night, young americans aren't dreaming or aren't believing the dreams are accessible to them. >> >> you mentioned mitt romney who until three weeks ago was the leader of the party. mitt romney going to disappear or does he have a continuing role? >> i hope he doesn't disappear and hope he has a continuing role. first of all, very few people have done what he has done, run for president and be the nominee of the party. >> and get crushed. >> that's not accurate. he got 47%. he won a lot of states. he didn't lose 49-1. he won places and has a lot of supporters. but he has been successful at life. and i told him this, too. mitt romney is a role model as a person, a father, husband, community leader. he has a lot to offer the repub
martha: thanks for being with us, everybody. the driving dogs has to wait unfor the in the leave. it's outstanding we'll catch you on the radio in about 20 minutes. martha: see you there, by, guys. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
no brand-new stories and breaking news. jenna: fox news confirming chemical weapons are now ready for use in syria. the military awaiting orders from president bashar al-assad to launch the deadly nerve gas on its own people. what is next for us and the rest of the community. the national hurricane center getting blasted for something it didn't do. we'll talk about that with janice dean. plus one man running seven ultramarathons on seven continents in seven days. why? is the big question. it's all "happening now." we'll start with news from overseas, very disturbing developments out of syria today. glad you're with us, everybody, i'm jenna lee. jon: good morning, i'm jon scott. as the violence rages out of control. fox news confirms syria's military finished mixing saran gas. they are waiting for orders from bashar al-assad. only 60 days before the gas expires and needs to be destroyed. all this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton gets ready for a rare meeting with her russian counterpart on the crisis rocking syria. that could be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its
administration. in our opinion, government data must be published and must be publishing an useful that means it has to be standardized, machine-readable and up until now, we haven't done a very good job with that. does someone have a phone? up until now we haven't done a good job with the publication. what is our view of what the obama administration has accomplished in his first four years? has the administration made strides towards publishing the government data? yes, absolutely. has the administration published the most valuable government data? now. the data from the core of government, the information that staff members at executive branch agencies reliant to make their decision has not been published. our coalition think says government in five categories. the transparency community we spend time categorizing beautiful policy categorization, so i won't spend too much time on this. broadly speaking the outside but it's usually talk about. spending, management and performance, regulation, legislation and judicial documents. in each case, certain data is at the core of government, the me
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>alisyn: thanks for watching today. "studio b" with shepard smith starts right now. >>shepard: moving right along. good to see you. the news begins anew on "studio b" today with thousands of protests in michigan could not stop lawmakers from passing bills that hurt union power. this could have a major impact on unions nationwide. the feds accuse a big bank of doing business with iran, cuba and libya and mexican drug cartels to the tune of billions and billions of dollars. who did they arrest? nobody in who are they trying to arrest? nobody. there is a fine. we will get to that. put down the cough syrup. pick up chocolate candy. researchers say chocolate could be more effective treatment in treating the common cough. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b" today. first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, a major blow to labor unions wait for the michigan governor's signature. today, state lawmakers pass add measure that weakens la
>> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we are grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the aloha state. and for the gift of discernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america. as we express gratitude for the laudable footprints he left in the sands of time, give us your power to persevere impromptly doing what is right. may the memory of senator inouye's indefatigable faithfulness provide a benchmark for the lives of all who labor for liberty. lord, intensify our dedication to make sacrifices for the good of our nation and world as we put our trust in you to do for us immeasurably, abundantly, above all that we can ask or imagine, according to your power working in and through us. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. >> senator dan inouye was a noble soul. one of the finest men i've ever met. united states senate and entire country are poorer for his l
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
. >>> it took us three months to establish trust. these guys don't trust each other. they don't even trust each other in their own party. you've got leaders who, people behind them with a shif hoping they can get their job the next go 'round. poor old durbin has people over his back because he voted for this package. and the republicans, boehner's got to go to work and come back, and now there's 70 of them left, the tea party guys. these are guys who went to congress not to limit government but to stop it. so what are you going to do? we've got five democrats, five republicans who range from dick durbin of illinois, great progressive democrat, and coburn of oklahoma, a progressive conservative, and five dems, five republicans, one independent, that's a super majority. and for god's sake, the reason we were so successful is we effectively pissed off everybody in america. >> congratulations, sir. kudos. kudos to you. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 6th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc political analyst, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr. >> mr. professor. >> g
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
. going to greg but he went already. leave it there. thank you for joining us tonight and throughout the year. we have the greatest fans on the planet. thank you. we also wish a happy new year to bob and dana. cheers to you guys. here is to making my prediction the reality. "the five" number one in 2013. let's do it everybody. of course to the troops whose commitment to freedom keeps us safe, sound and secure. thanks to all. good night, everyone. be careful out there tonight. let's do this. >> kimberly: happy new year! >> oh, no! ♪ >> bret: two words you've likely heard too many times. "fiscal cliff." the country will officially go over it tonight. congress will miss a midnight deadline. so what now? will washington prevent significant economic fall-out come wednesday? this is "special report." ♪ ♪ good evening. i'm bret baier. when the giant crystal ball makes the last move in times square tonight, 2013 will officially be here. and so will the deadline. for a deal here in washington. politicians self-imposed fiscal cliff. the effort to make the consequences so unattractive for
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)